The Wisdom Academy - Faith inspired British values 

Personal belonging to the Islamic faith and a general belonging to British society are promoted in the school as essentially two complimentary aspects of pupil identity. Pupils are encouraged to see their faith as the motivation to respect and contribute to wider society finding a common ground to flourish in. To achieve this, British values are promoted in the following ways:

Democracy 

  • School Council  

Pupils from Year 2 upwards hold annual class elections in October to put forward a representative on the School Council. Once candidates have put their name forward, they participate in a week-long election campaign, allowing pupils a tangible experience of representative democracy. Elected representatives then meet every fortnight  with the Head Teacher and are encouraged to collect the views of their class in preparation for the meetings.

  • In the Curriculum 

Children have ample opportunities to learn about democracy in the formal teaching curriculum particularly in PSHE and History and Citizenship units in Topic lessons. Examples include the modern significance of the Houses of Parliament in Year 2's learning of the Gunpowder plot,

Rule of Law

  • At school

As part of the school's wider focus on managing feelings and behaviour, staff ensure that children understand their own and others’ behaviour and its consequences, and learn to distinguish right from wrong at every opportunity. This is achieved through the collaboration of staff and pupils in establishing rules and codes of behaviour that are clear, concise and consistent. ClassDojo is the main behaviour management tool with rewards and sanctions clearly communicated to the pupils.

  • Wider society

Visits from the authorities including the police, fire services and crossing patrol officer are a regular part of the school's tradition to respect the importance of abiding by rules with the understanding that a common agreed law keeps everyone safe and actions always have consequences.

Individual Liberty

  • Pursuing an interest

We provide good opportunities for our pupils to make choices that reflect their individual talents, interests and goals through participation in a range of extra-curricular clubs, outings and activities. The school has offered clubs ranging from archery, walking and football to pottery, community engagement, reading and knitting. Extra-curricular clubs are reviewed regularly to reflect the children's needs and preferences and taster sessions are made available throughout the year to help pupils make their choices

  • Setting sights on the road ahead

We encourage Year 6 pupils to work in partnership with their parents to consider the full range of options in their choice of secondary school - state, private, faith, non-faith, single-sex, mixed or grammar putting the pupils first in the next stage of their educational development and giving them a thorough sense of the wider educational spectrum. Information pamphlets, time-off for open days, opportunities for secondary staff to visit the school and advice are provided in an open manner in order to reinforce a sense of ownership in their future.

Mutual Respect

Respect for all people regardless of age, gender, faith and personal expression forms a vital part of the school's overall ethos. It is embedded in the school's calendar through thematic whole-school initiatives and assemblies along with the Curriculum - explicitly in the Islamic Studies and Topic curriculums along with cross-curricular learning in Literacy, Art and Science.

Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs

Learning in Islamic Studies, Topic and PSHE provide the backbone of our pupils' understanding of the range of views that exist in the wider world. Opportunities to complete a unit of study of a non Islamic faith from Year 2 upwards ensure that pupils learn about a new faith each year. Representatives of different faiths and non-faiths are regularly invited during the course of the year and a multi-faith display takes a prominent position in the school's corridor.

What is not acceptable at our school is:

  • actively promoting intolerance of other faiths, cultures and races
  • failure to challenge gender stereotypes and routinely segregate girls and boys
  • isolating children from their wider community
  • failure to challenge behaviours (whether of staff, children or parents) that are not in line with the fundamental British values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty,
  • not having mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs